History of the Olde Coloma Theatre

"The Building"

Starring The Olde Coloma Theatre

The Cast

Division of Natural Resources
State of California Beaches, Park and Recreation
Dedicated members of the community and the Coloma Crescent Players

Players

...ad infinitum

The Story

In 1939 there was erected a beautiful log cabin by the Division of Natural Resources at the San Francisco World's Exposition. After serving its allotted time, it was decreed said building (our heroine) should not face annihilation but instead be moved to a permanent home to function as a useful part of society. No sooner decreed than done.

 

She arrived at Mt. Danaher in the summer of 1941 and was ready to begin a new career as barracks for California Division of Forestry Rangers.

 

(She? Let me check the script again!) Well, as time passed she became a warehouse, recreation/warehouse and finally an obsolete damsel in distress. Her youth gone, she was left to stand in loneliness, shunned, ignored, not wanted (Awww).

Enter the Villain! He decreed she was to be razed! Burned at the stake (or her stakes burned, whichever)! Once more fate stepped in. Our local hero, one Black Barton Gassler, begged clemency for our heroine: said she was welcome in Coloma (Yea! Cheers!).

 

But alas, our villain decided differently. Scoundrel that he was, he fought to prevent her finding happiness (Boo!).

 

Enter June Scott, behind Black Barton, and off to the State Capitol, to then Governor Ronald Reagan, to beg clemency for the life of said log cabin. A theatre was desperately needed to house a passel of homeless thespians. Could we have the building? Yes, we were told, then No! Like a ping pong ball tossed about on a hot random number table, the decision was bounced back and forth. A true-to-life Melodrama.

 

However, hope and perspicacity (plus a lot of hard work) won out and she now stands, a proud beauty once more adored, wanted, cared for, and above all...Needed!

A lobby and a stage were added, as well as restrooms, green room, and storage to the rear.




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